Typojanchi 2013
Seoul International Typography Biennale

August 30–October 11
10:00 am– 7:00 pm
Closed every Monday
Free admission

Culture Station Seoul 284
1 Tongil-ro, Jung-gu
Seoul 100-162, Korea
T. 82-2-3407-3500
F. 82-2-3407-3510

twitter@typojanchi
facebook.com/typojanchi2013

Hosted by
Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism

Organized by
Korea Craft & Design Foundation
Korean Society of Typography

Credits

Typojanchi 2013
Administration Office
Korea Craft & Design Foundation
5F, 53 Yulgok-no, Jongno-gu
Seoul 110-240, Korea
T. 82-2-398-7945
F. 82-2-398-7999
E. typojanchi@kcdf.kr

Typojanchi 2011

F. R. David
 
2007–ongoing
Offset lithography, sewn in sections, cover, insert
Amsterdam: De Appel

Issue 1, “As Yet…”
Spring 2007
12 x 19 x 1.4 cm, 200 pp
Edited with Falke Pisano

Issue 2, “The Book of Intentions”
Summer 2008
12 x 19 x 1.7 cm, 244 pp
Edited with Yulia Aksenova, Jesse Birch, Ann Demeester, Edna van Duyn, Sarah Farrar, Inti Guerrero, Virginija Januskeviciute and Dieter Roelstraete

Issue 3, “A is for ‘Orses’ (Not for Asses)”
Autumn 2008
12 x 19 x 1.6 cm, 216 pp
Edited with Ann Demeester and Dieter Roelstraete

Issue 4, “Stuff and Nonsense”
Winter 2008
12 x 19 x 1.7 cm, 240 pp
Edited with Ann Demeester and Dieter Roelstraete

Issue 5, “Keep It to Yourself”
Spring 2009
12 x 19 x 1.7 cm, 240 pp
Edited with Ann Demeester and Dieter Roelstraete

Issue 6, “Iditorial”
Winter 2009
12 x 19 x 0.6 cm, 80 pp
Edited with Ann Demeester, Dieter Roelstraete and Edna van Duyn

Issue 7, “With Love”
Summer 2010
12 x 19 x 1.3 cm, 176 pp

Issue 8, “Spin Cycle”
Summer 2011
12 x 19 x 1.5 cm, 208 pp
Edited with Mike Sperlinger

Issue 9, “This is Not New, of Course”
Spring 2012
12 x 19 x 1.7 cm, 240 pp

Issue 10, “… for Single Mothers”
Spring 2013
12 x 19 x 1.5 cm, 208 pp


Will Holder
Born in 1969, UK

The London-based typographer Will Holder makes publications with artists, using orality and conversation as tool and model for publishing conditions—whereby roles of commissioner, author, subject, editor, and designer are improvised and shared. Holder is editor of F. R. David, a journal concerned with reading and writing in the arts. In May 2009 he co-curated TalkShow at the ICA, London: an exhibition/events programme dealing with speech and accountability. He is co-editing a biography of American composer Robert Ashley, for four or more voices; and rewriting William Morris’ News from Nowhere (1876) into a serially published guide for design education and practise—set in 2135.

The following text is based on Will Holder’s interview for The Magazine (Paju: G-Colon Book, 2013). The original text has been slightly amended both by the author and the editors.

[About the background of F. R. David]
The journal was seen as part of the visual identity of De Appel Arts Centre, its publisher. When Ann Demeester took over as director, I began to produce the Centre’s communication. Besides wishing to represent Ann’s affinity between literature and the arts, and the idea of the artist as singular author-genius, the identity (simply: “A is for apple”—or the “perpetuum mobile” between image/text that produces an ongoing, infinite adjustment of meaning and value) hoped to indicate that the writing produced around artworks (including press releases, administration, journalism etc.) were an equally “designed” part of the “identity” of an institution—yet usually not in the hands of the “graphic” designer. The best one can do is aim to set up a programme that fosters and distributes a sensitivity to reading and writing. My aim was to broaden the potential of that writing, by example. Though De Appel has supported me in this, I don’t think it had much real resonance with their own—written and read—identity. This was and is my idealism, I suppose.

[About the designing and editing]
From the point of view of design, though not unimportant, a simple set of typographic rules were set up from the start, and followed in detail until today, enabling more time for involvement with the editorial. Many of the details are an extension of De Appel’s old* identity, such as the covers being printed in the apple’s red, green and black, on the matte side of a two-sided postcard stock (alluding to images usually being printed on the glossy side, text on matte side). The play between image and text still plays out in the varying use of the traditional “initial” at the beginning of a chapter—most successful when text (short poems) becomes an image. This also plays out on the cover: each issue has a letter on the spine, spelling out F.R.DAVID WORDS DON’T COME EASY (currently at the “D” of “WORDS”). Each letter is represented on the cover, in the hope that if one sees the spine-letter in the bookcase, a mental image of the cover may be produced (e.g., “R” is for “Do we suppose that all she knows is that a rose is a rose is a rose is a rose” of the four covers for the Spring 2013 issue). One thing that still pleases me is the contents on the bookmark (I should patent this!).

Editorially: the most important aspect is a responsibility to reproduce the conditions of reading, and the effect that a certain text produced in me, the editor. The sequence and ordering of writings is an important factor in setting this up (i.e., managing the conditions of reading). Besides that it is difficult to say how I choose certain works, and usually an issue’s “theme” doesn’t surface until I’m far into reading as much material as I can. Usually, I go to the British Library with a few books waiting for me. These lead to others, and I can sit there for days enjoying reading. Besides reproducing this pleasure, I am conscious of a set of very human ideas, which, like reading may be universally understood. Again—there is a very fine line between typesetting and writing, for me—this is an expression of design: i.e., how those ideas are formed towards a shared understanding. The design lies in their textual expression. Language is a material that not only artists and designers, but those from all walks of life produce for the same means and ends: we all read, write, speak and listen to maintain the interdependency of our various occupations. My work is to set up conditions for reading/ learning/ exchange/ publishing that enable something like a “craft” of a linguistic exchange to develop, and pragmatically play out between those who co-produce the work of others.

[About the process of making]
Following a definition of typography as “the organisation of language,” F. R. David enables me to practice the management and design of reading and writing—without this becoming an academic or hypothetical pursuit. What this means is that the journal is a demonstration of how ideas adapt and evolve as they are exchanged. These ideas do not follow a fixed protocol—as academic writing might, for example. In this sense, my calling it a “journal” has more in common with it being a record of what I read, from day to day, in an attempt at transferring an increasingly refined understanding of reading and writing (sometimes I worry that people who only come to F. R. David now, will be lost without the slow build-up in the past six years). “From day to day” means that this takes place in all kinds of situations, but at all times—not just the library, of course—and the transformation of an idea from a library book to a recipe for bread to a pop song (F. R. David’s motto, “Words, Don’t come easy,” is from the eighties hit) to a piece of furniture back to a poem, is all part of life. F. R. David is a record of the liveliness of ideas.

*I must stress that I have not been the designer at De Appel for more than two years, and my “A” has been pushed aside for a more spectacular, image-driven form of communication.

[Will Holder]


F. R. David

Issue 1, “As Yet….” Spring 2007


F. R. David

Issue 1, “As Yet….” Spring 2007


F. R. David

Issue 1, “As Yet….” Spring 2007


F. R. David

Issue 2, “The Book of Intentions.” Summer 2008


F. R. David

Issue 2, “The Book of Intentions.” Summer 2008


F. R. David

Issue 3, “A is for ‘Orses’ (Not for Asses).” Autumn 2008


F. R. David

Issue 4, “Stuff and Nonsense.” Winter 2008


F. R. David

Issue 5, “Keep It to Yourself.” Spring 2009


F. R. David

Issue 5, “Keep It to Yourself.” Spring 2009


F. R. David

Issue 6, “Iditorial.” Winter 2009


F. R. David

Issue 6, “Iditorial.” Winter 2009


F. R. David

Issue 7, “With Love.” Summer 2010


F. R. David

Issue 7, “With Love.” Summer 2010


F. R. David

Issue 8, “Spin Cycle.” Summer 2011


F. R. David

Issue 8, “Spin Cycle.” Summer 2011


F. R. David

Issue 9, “This is Not New, of Course.” Spring 2012


F. R. David

Issue 9, “This is Not New, of Course.” Spring 2012


F. R. David

Issue 10, “… for Single Mothers.” Spring 2013


F. R. David

Issue 10, “… for Single Mothers.” Spring 2013


F. R. David

Issue 10, “… for Single Mothers.” Spring 2013


© Typojanchi 2013