Typojanchi 2013
Seoul International Typography Biennale

August 30–October 11
10:00 am– 7:00 pm
Closed every Monday
Free admission

Culture Station Seoul 284
1 Tongil-ro, Jung-gu
Seoul 100-162, Korea
T. 82-2-3407-3500
F. 82-2-3407-3510

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Hosted by
Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism

Organized by
Korea Craft & Design Foundation
Korean Society of Typography

Credits

Typojanchi 2013
Administration Office
Korea Craft & Design Foundation
5F, 53 Yulgok-no, Jongno-gu
Seoul 110-240, Korea
T. 82-2-398-7945
F. 82-2-398-7999
E. typojanchi@kcdf.kr

Typojanchi 2011

Techniques of the Body
 
2013
Mixed-media installation
Dimensions variable

Untitled (September magazine)
 
2013
Offset lithography, cut and glued, cover
22 x 28.5 x 2.1 cm, 592 pp
Designed with Julie Peeters
Amsterdam: Roma Publications / London: Vanity Press

Paul Elliman
Born in 1961, UK

Paul Elliman is a London-based artist. Across a range of media, including typography, the human voice, bodily gestures, publication, performance and writing, he explores the relationship between technology and language, often with a critical focus on aspects of graphic design or forms and uses of processed language. His work has been shown internationally at museums and galleries, recent examples including Kumu Art Museum of Estonia, Tallinn (2013); Henry Art Gallery, University of Washington, Seattle (2012–2013); Marres Centre for Contemporary Culture, Maastricht (2012–2013); Lux/ICA Biennial of Moving Images, Tramway, Glasgow (2012); and Museum of Modern Art, New York (2012). He had his solo exhibition at Wallspace Gallery, New York, in 2013. Elliman is visiting critic at Yale University, New Haven, and graduate thesis supervisor at the Werkplaats Typografie, Arnhem.

Who pays for the light in your eyes? I’m about to go shopping. Like a body fluttering its empty sleeve, its mimic motion lifting both shoulders to indicate a lack of knowing or concern. Love extends itself so that we can love even with our clothes, so that a sleeve can feel a sleeve. Ah then, like summer breeze in lovely trees, and not without a certain wild pleasure, I run for the bus dear. Snapping the fingers of one hand over her head, a figure in a suit of bones—she’s blue with blonde streaks that look like marble, badly stained, waits at the station. Someone is leaning, restlessly folding his arms, stood sullenly between them, like an actor from another scene caught by the unexpected raising of a curtain. There. In corduroy trousers, canvas shoes, dark hair on her shoulders, bent over the back of her chair, face in her arms. A forearm arched. Sat in the park. Walk in London or on my street. Look at your hand. It’s real. A symbol she couldn’t have said of what. Commerce without words. How much is he making?—can’t tell—and “That’s the way to be.” No she said in a movement, an animal that didn’t yet recognise her captivity, that’s just what it isn’t.

[Paul Elliman]


Techniques of the Body
 
Choi Sung Min: The images shown here are from an archive of source material used in the production of your untitled 592-page “September magazine.” Is this a new direction for your work?

Paul Elliman: Not really, I was collecting images that show the body communicating as a language of gestures well before I found a way to work directly with typography—or mainly against it. A few years later, after working with the found typography of objects, I started to think about these images in relation to forms of writing.

CSM: You’ve spoken about these images connecting with a gestural language much older than typography or written language…

PE: Also that I find them in contemporary magazines, an image-based media where gestural language also belongs to a more recent technical stage of human communication.

CSM: Gestures mediated just as writing is, sometimes even looking like writing?

PE: Some of the shapes and lines resemble script or alphabetical signs: vertical, diagonal or horizontal limbs; straight, arching or crossed arms, the curve of the back or the neck. But in most cases they seem even more abstract, whether moving or still, even while enacting gender or other socially specific coded gestures or posture.

CSM: And the images show the body communicating via a cultural semiotics of clothing, a further example of language developing under the impact of mass-production?

PE: Yes, but I’m also a body and I’m interested in what the body is or wants. These images try to frame gestural language between a history of mechanical language in relation to the body, something I can’t really trust, and how the body communicates its own sensual mechanisms, which I think I can still believe in.

[August 2013]


O Tell Me the Truth About Love
 
O Tell Me the Truth About Love is an ongoing list of industrial materials that Elliman began compiling in 2002. Taking its title from a song lyric by the poet W. H. Auden (which lists out things, places and events that are supposed to characterize “love”), the list offers a roll call of all those things that constitute our material lives yet are rarely called by names other than a few generic terms such as wood, metal, paper or plastic. Lacking any apparent order, the list is presented as a long, unending single sentence that merges the production of materials with the production of language, reflecting the inconclusive nature of both.

O Tell Me the Truth About Love
 
2002–ongoing

Die-cast metal, black annealed wire, hot-dipped bright-spangled galv, zinc section, copper, tungsten, chromium, friction-welded bright bar, sheared-edge zintec, lead, cast iron, nickel foil, brass, cold-rolled mild steel, white antistatic non-toxic PVC, ceramic metal, matt black thermoplastic, bonded natural rubber, spring steel, ivory faced insulation board, rebar, lycra, bitumastic, stainless steel foil, profiled medium density fibreboard, unalloyed nickel, TiCoat™, structural steel, lamellar graphite, high strength bronze, cermet (metal-ceramics), nebar, aluminium, molybdenum steel, veneered board, brazed carbide, high cobalt steel, polyurethane tube, fine steel wool, blow-moulded plastic, polypropylene, butyl, PVA, PVC, perspex, Ripstop Nylon™, […]


Techniques of the Body

Techniques of the Body


Techniques of the Body

Techniques of the Body


Untitled

Untitled (September magazine)


Untitled

Untitled (September magazine)


Untitled

Untitled (September magazine)


Untitled

Untitled (September magazine)


Untitled

Untitled (September magazine)


© Typojanchi 2013