Typojanchi 2013
Seoul International Typography Biennale

August 30–October 11
10:00 am– 7:00 pm
Closed every Monday
Free admission

Culture Station Seoul 284
1 Tongil-ro, Jung-gu
Seoul 100-162, Korea
T. 82-2-3407-3500
F. 82-2-3407-3510

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Hosted by
Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism

Organized by
Korea Craft & Design Foundation
Korean Society of Typography

Credits

Typojanchi 2013
Administration Office
Korea Craft & Design Foundation
5F, 53 Yulgok-no, Jongno-gu
Seoul 110-240, Korea
T. 82-2-398-7945
F. 82-2-398-7999
E. typojanchi@kcdf.kr

Typojanchi 2011

The Order of Things
 
2012
Offset lithography, sewn in sections, cover, outsert
10.5 x 17.8 x 1.6 cm, 432 pp
Original text by Michel Foucault, English translation (1970)
Designed by Astrid Seme
Karlsruhe/Vienna: Mark Pezinger Verlag

Mikko Kuorinki
Born in 1977, Finland

kuorinki.com

The artist Mikko Kuorinki uses various media from performance and installation to video, photography and publication to investigate an individual’s relationship to the world, often mediated by language. He earned a BA in photography from Turku Arts Academy, Finland, and an MFA from the University of Arts and Design Helsinki. He has held solo exhibitions at institutions including Sinne, Helsinki; Percival Space, Oslo; INCA, Detroit; CAC Reading Room, Vilnius; Finnish Museum of Photography, Helsinki; and Skånes Konstförening, Malmö. His work has also been included in many international group exhibitions.

The desire to classify the world has always been a need for mankind: we collect, reflect and sort things. Michel Foucault wrote extensively about this phenomena in his book The Order of Things: An Archaeology of the Human Sciences (1966), one of the core works that anchor the French structuralist school of thought. The Finnish artist Mikko Kuorinki interpreted Foucault’s title literally and put all the words in the book in alphabetical order: from “A” to “Zoophytorum.” In the tradition of conceptual art, Kuorinki reordered knowledge that is already available. He decomposed a text to an alphabetical material—and composed at the same time a new text, which offers us a very unusual view into the thinking of the French philosopher. [Thomas Geiger]

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© Typojanchi 2013