Typojanchi 2013
Seoul International Typography Biennale

August 30–October 11
10:00 am– 7:00 pm
Closed every Monday
Free admission

Culture Station Seoul 284
1 Tongil-ro, Jung-gu
Seoul 100-162, Korea
T. 82-2-3407-3500
F. 82-2-3407-3510

twitter@typojanchi
facebook.com/typojanchi2013

Hosted by
Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism

Organized by
Korea Craft & Design Foundation
Korean Society of Typography

Credits

Typojanchi 2013
Administration Office
Korea Craft & Design Foundation
5F, 53 Yulgok-no, Jongno-gu
Seoul 110-240, Korea
T. 82-2-398-7945
F. 82-2-398-7999
E. typojanchi@kcdf.kr

Typojanchi 2011

A Way of Making Jokes
 
2013
Mixed-media installation and performance
Dimensions variable

Kimm Kijo
Born in 1984, Korea

kijet.egloos.com

While still studying graphic design at Seoul National University in 2004, Kimm Kijo started operating as art director at the independent music label BGBG Record, Seoul, and since 2010, he has been running his own studio, Kijoside. He has created record sleeve designs and art-directed for numerous Korean indie-rock bands, including Jang Kiha and the Faces, Broccoli, You Too?, Nuntteugo Cobain, and Mimi Sisters.

Apart from the work for music industry for which he is mostly known, he has also been creating more autonomous work, often taking banal text bits from headlines, campaign slogans and silly jokes, and rendering them in a style strongly reminiscent of the lettering from the 1960s and 1970s Korean popular culture. Rather than a nostalgic retro, however, his work echoes the anxiety and frustration of today’s youth in the visual language borrowed from the recent past—the times when, as it may seem now, the idea of life as something makable and improvable could be held more plausibly. Thus, in its oblique way, his work responds to the future, or the present difficulty of imagining it.


“The moment when a joke is taken out of its context and put on the wall, it ceases to be a joke,” says Kimm. Instead, A Way of Making Jokes attempts to present the total context, the time and the place for him to make jokes. The artist prepares a certain place in the exhibition space, occupies it at certain times, acting by certain rules, producing jokes. The “joke” in question may be the visual/verbal messages he creates on site, or the site itself, or himself trying to make jokes. Or, perhaps the most poignant joke here is the situation itself with the artist coming to the space as if it was a workplace, making jokes as if it was his job, and the visitors watching him working to make jokes.

The essence of a joke lies in the space suddenly opened up by an unexpected utterance, in an unexpected time and place and situation. Then, a joke “produced” without spontaneity in a situation where the joke is clearly expected, is not exactly a joke anymore. If not a joke “taken out of its context and put on the wall,” then one embedded in the context, or the context as a joke, A Way of Making Jokes explores the complex mechanisms by which things are said to amuse others.


A Way of Making Jokes

A Way of Making Jokes

A Way of Making Jokes

Courtesy: the artist


A Way of Making Jokes

Courtesy: the artist


A Way of Making Jokes

Courtesy: the artist


A Way of Making Jokes

Courtesy: the artist


A Way of Making Jokes

Courtesy: the artist


A Way of Making Jokes

Courtesy: the artist


A Way of Making Jokes

Courtesy: the artist


A Way of Making Jokes

Courtesy: the artist


A Way of Making Jokes

Courtesy: the artist


© Typojanchi 2013