Typojanchi 2013
Seoul International Typography Biennale

August 30–October 11
10:00 am– 7:00 pm
Closed every Monday
Free admission

Culture Station Seoul 284
1 Tongil-ro, Jung-gu
Seoul 100-162, Korea
T. 82-2-3407-3500
F. 82-2-3407-3510

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Hosted by
Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism

Organized by
Korea Craft & Design Foundation
Korean Society of Typography

Credits

Typojanchi 2013
Administration Office
Korea Craft & Design Foundation
5F, 53 Yulgok-no, Jongno-gu
Seoul 110-240, Korea
T. 82-2-398-7945
F. 82-2-398-7999
E. typojanchi@kcdf.kr

Typojanchi 2011

Alphabet A
 
2013
Acrylic on canvas
97 x 130 cm

Alphabets 2013
 
2013
Acrylic on canvas
26 paintings as a set
16 x 23 cm each

Sugiyama Takuro
Born in 1983, Japan

takuro-sugiyama.com

Sugiyama Takuro graduated from Osaka College of Art in 2004, and has since participated in many group exhibitions in Japan, Korea, Taiwan, and Hong Kong. He has held his solo exhibitions in YOD Gallery and Space Gallery Roundish in Osaka.

Sugiyama Takuro is an artist living and working in Hyogo Prefecture, Japan. His paintings are characterized by a unique sense of distorted dimensions. Using geometric shapes and restrained color palettes, he creates forms that lie somewhere between two-dimensional composition and three-dimensional illusion. The imagery may look digitally processed, but they are conceived solely by the artist’s human mind and executed by his hands. His painting process is known to be intuitive, depending much on his spontaneous feelings at the moment.

Although most of his paintings are abstract, there is something curiously textual to them. In his untitled paintings, for example, there are elements highlighted by color—usually red—that remind of the letters “S” or “O.” It might be a pure coincidence, the impression accidentally made by the crooked shapes to letter-obsessed eyes. But at least to the letter-obsessed eyes, the distorted red shapes interwoven with the fragmented gray elements can suggest a certain meaning barely emerging out of—or, reversely, leaving its debris around—the fractured structures.

And there are the Alphabet paintings. Characteristically pseudo-dimensional, the structures depicted in the paintings are easily recognizable as representing the letters of the Latin alphabet. But it is partly by virtue of their framing and context: the series name, the fact that there are twenty-six paintings in the set. When isolated and without additional information, each painting can also look purely abstract. Then again, the alphabetic characters are already abstract signs, in a sense that they do not have physical or concrete existence, nor do they have any inherent, figurative relationship to what they represent. Perhaps for this reason, there have been attempts to retroactively establish a material origin or anchor of the letters, by correlating the forms to the actual things in the world: trees, buildings, the human face and the body.

With their distorted and broken shapes, Sugiyama’s Alphabet paintings seem to suggest the impossibility of such endeavors, while still acknowledging the pleasure of finding linguistic signs overlapped with the allusions to tangible objects. A hope of communication in the world of disjointed surfaces and nonsensical sensations, one may see. As for Sugiyama himself, he keeps painting until he completes the twenty-six characters.


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© Typojanchi 2013